sábado, 25 de marzo de 2017

wooden boat

Wooden boat with an eight-man crew, six of whom are oarsmen, one a helmsman and one a lighterman. The boat does not have a keel but rather two high supports (one of them now broken) for the main directional oar at the bow and another at the prow for the moveable mast.
Present location MUSEU NACIONAL DE ARQUEOLOGIA [46/003] LISBON
Inventory number E 139 (n. cat. 236)
Dating MIDDLE KINGDOM
Archaeological Site UNKNOWN
Category BOAT (MODEL)
Material WOOD
Technique SCULPTURED
Width 37 cm
http://www.globalegyptianmuseum.org/detail.aspx?id=11661
Bibliography•Antiguidades Egípcias I, Lisboa, 1993

Eye

The right inlaid eye from a statue or sarcophagus. The inlaid pupil that used to shine in the polished cornea is now lost.
Present location MUSEU NACIONAL DE ARQUEOLOGIA [46/003] LISBON
Inventory number E 163 (n. cat. 266)
Dating LATE PERIOD
Archaeological Site UNKNOWN
Category SCULPTURE IN THE ROUND
Material BRONZE
Technique CASTING
Height 2.5 cm
http://www.globalegyptianmuseum.org/detail.aspx?id=11688
Bibliography•Antiguidades Egípcias I, Lisboa, 1993

viernes, 24 de marzo de 2017

tomb 25 Ay


The inner part of this wall (that which would not be covered by the open door) is taken up with thirteen long columns of text. As on the opposite wall, there is a representation of kneeling figures of Ay and Tiy adoring Aten .
They give a good example of the Amarna style, modelled in soft accentuated curves. The faces are rather badly preserved, but the elegance of the figures is noticeable : the play with the transparency of the dress; the collars, bracelets and braided hair, are all detailed with precision.
Located in the southern group of tombs, the tomb of Ay bears the number 25. It was discovered in 1883 by Hay, filled with a great deal of broken pottery and later burials. It was only cleared entirely, ten years later, in 1893.
osirisnet.net

Horemheb Saqqara

Horemheb
Saqqara
osirisnet.net

Naophorous statue of a man

Naophorous statue of a man
This kneeling statue of a man, damaged in several places, is holding a shrine containing a falcon-headed deity. The man is recognizable as a High Priest of Ptah in the Great Temple of Memphis because of his hairstyle, which consists of a short curly wig with an additional tress on the right side of the head, the so-called lock of youth. This is a symbol of youthfulness for high-ranking or divine children, but in their case it hangs from a shaven head. The other indication of the man's rank is not clearly visible because it has been carved in very shallow relief and has suffered weathering. It is an animal skin, usually described as that of a dog, which is worn over the shoulder. The name of the person depicted has not been preserved in the surviving inscriptions. The style of the cutting of the round face with its fine details, large eyes, thin nose and smile all point to a date in the 3rd Intermediate Period. The statue greatly resembles a statue in Budapest of Shoshonk the son of Osorkon II, who held the post of High Priest of Memphis during the 22nd Dynasty. Perhaps the Vienna statue depicts the same person.
Present location KUNSTHISTORISCHES MUSEUM [09/001] VIENNA
Inventory number 5773
Dating 22ND DYNASTY ?
Archaeological Site UNKNOWN
Category STATUE
Material UNSPECIFIED
Technique HEWN
Height 105 cm
Width 37.5 cm
Depth 58 cm
Translation
An offering which the king gives to Ptah, south of his wall, the Lord of Ankhtauy, so that he may give offering bread which has been presented to him on the table of the lords of eternity...
Which the king gives to Osiris-Khont[amenti] ..., so that he gives, ...
An offering [which the king gives to] Sokar-Osiris, who resides in the Shetit shrine, so that he may allow the entering and leaving of Rosetau and the vision of all the gods of the Netherworld to the Ka of the Hereditary Prince, the first [great one of his majesty ...
An offering which the king gives to Osiris-Khontamenti, the great god and [ruler] of the living, so that he may give a funerary offering of bread and beer, of offerings, food, and all good and pure things for the first master of secrets (?) ...
Bibliography•Rogge, E., Statuen des Neuen Reiches und der Dritten Zwischenzeit. Corpus Antiquitatum Aegyptiacarum (CAA) Wien 6 (1990), 164-172.
•Satzinger, H., Das Kunsthistorische Museum in Wien. Die Ägyptisch-Orientalische Sammlung. Zaberns Bildbände zur Archäologie 14. Mainz. 1994.
•Kunsthistorisches Museum (KHM). Führer durch die Sammlungen. Wien. 1988.
•Satzinger, H., Ägyptische Kunst in Wien (Wien 1980).
http://www.globalegyptianmuseum.org/detail.aspx?id=5109

Head of an old man

Head of an old man
It is a piece of luck that exactly this piece of the statue of the old man has been preserved because it almost makes us forget how fragmentary it is. Only the face is preserved, together with a part of the bag-shaped wig and some of the neck. Nothing remains of his garments. Nevertheless, the damage to the statue does not impair the impact of this sculpture, which is considered to be among the most fascinating products of Egyptian art.
We are dealing with a very important masterpiece from the later phases of ancient Egyptian history. The accurate rendition of the anatomy and the marks of old age may be ascribed to Hellenistic influence, but there is also evidence of the native Egyptian tradition of the Late Period which underlies this development.
It is a great pity that we do not know the identity of the person depicted. It is without doubt a person marked by the responsibilities and burdens of high office and by a successful career. The current state of knowledge does not allow a precise dating of the sculpture. Most comparable pieces, such as the "green heads" in Berlin and Boston, are likewise uninscribed and their dates remain much debated. A date in the middle of the Ptolemaic period, in the third century BC, seems reasonable. It is clear that the fragment has preserved a fascinating portrait of one of the people who played a leading role in the political and religious life of the country at that time.
Present location KUNSTHISTORISCHES MUSEUM [09/001] VIENNA
Inventory number 42
Dating PTOLEMAIC PERIOD
Archaeological Site UNKNOWN
Category STATUE
Material SLATE
Technique HEWN; POLISHED
Height 31.3 cm
Width 15 cm
Depth 14.5 cm
http://www.globalegyptianmuseum.org/detail.aspx?id=4964
Bibliography•Übersicht der kunsthistorischen Sammlungen II. Sammlung der ägyptischen Altertümer (1923) 19, Nr. 21.
•Demel, H., Einige Aegyptische Porträtköpfe, 5.
•Seipel, W. (ed.), Gott Mensch Pharao (1992).
•Seipel, W. (ed.), Götter Menschen Pharaonen, Speyer (1993) = Dioses, Hombres, Faraones, Ciudad de México (1993) = Das Vermächtnis der Pharaonen, Zürich (1994).
•Kunsthistorisches Museum (KHM). Führer durch die Sammlungen. Wien. 1988.
•Satzinger, H., Das Kunsthistorische Museum in Wien. Die Ägyptisch-Orientalische Sammlung. Zaberns Bildbände zur Archäologie 14. Mainz. 1994.
•Rogge, E., Statuen der Ptolemäerzeit. Corpus Antiquitatum Aegyptiacarum (CAA) Wien 11 (Druck in Vorbereitung).
•Bergmann, E. von, Übersicht über die ägyptischen Alterthümer (1876), Nr. 37.

Bust of a statue

Bust of a statue
Bust of a statue of a Persian official. He wears a skull cap leaving the ears bare, a shirt with a scoop neck and a triangular neck, and a Persian type collar with relief lion protomai at the extremities. The bust has a back-pillar with a trapezoidal top and the beginning of two columns of incised hieroglyphs.
Present location MUSEO ARCHEOLOGICO NAZIONALE/MUSEO EGIZIO [05/027] FLORENCE
Inventory number 11900
Dating 27TH DYNASTY AND CONTEMPORARIES
Archaeological Site UNSPECIFIED
Category STATUE
Material BASALT
Technique INCISION; HEWN
Height 36.5 cm
Width 42.2 cm
Depth 32 cm
Translation
The venerated one before Atum, the prince
The venerated one before Ra, the prince
Bibliography•G. Botti, Busto di un dignitario della XXVII dinastia nel Museo Egizio di Firenze, Bollettino d'Arte 2, 1956, pgg. 147-149.
•E.Bresciani, Una statua in "abito persiano" al Museo del Cairo, SCO 9, 1960, pg. 112.
•AA.VV., Il senso dell'arte nell'Antico Egitto, Milano, 1990, pg. 170, n. 117.
http://www.globalegyptianmuseum.org/detail.aspx?id=9005