martes, 1 de agosto de 2017

Karnak



Karnak

Templo de Abidos


Templo de Abidos

The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology: Characters and Collections

The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology: Characters and Collections 
format: 255x192mm
Paperback
ISBN: 978-1-910634-04-2
The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology first opened its doors in 1915, and since then has attracted visitors from all over the world as well as providing valuable teaching resources. Named after its founder, the pioneering archaeologist Flinders Petrie, the Museum holds more than 80,000 objects and is one of the largest and finest collections of Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology in the world. Richly illustrated and engagingly written, the book moves back and forth between recent history and the ancient past, between objects and people. Experts discuss the discovery, history and care of key objects in the collections such as the Koptos lions and Roman era panel portraits. The rich and varied history of the Petrie Museum is revealed by the secrets that sit on its shelves. 
About the author
Alice Stevenson is the Curator of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL. She was previously Researcher in World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum. Her academic specialisation is Predynastic and Early Dynastic Egyptian archaeology, but she has a broad range of interests including the history of archaeology, anthropology and museums. She has written and co-edited many works.

martes, 25 de julio de 2017

Bronze mirror


Bronze mirror, one side partly corroded, with separate tang in the same metal fixed by two circular pins at the point of attachment to the handle, now missing. In Egypt mirrors have been found most often in tombs of women, though they are sometimes found in burials of men of high status.


Inventory number
 1872:26A

New Kingdom


 NATIONAL MUSEUM OF IRELAND

http://www.globalegyptianmuseum.org/record.aspx?id=1503

The Tomb of Prince Montuherkhepeshef - KV19

The Tomb of Prince Montuherkhepeshef - KV19
Tomb KV19 of the Valley of the Kings dates from the end of Dynasty XX. This belongs to one of the sons of Ramesses IX, prince Montuherkhepeshef or Ramesses-Montuherkhepeshef ("Montu is above his powerful arm"), the prince and heir who died before he could reach the throne.
It was not originally intended for this burial, but initially planned for another prince, Ramesses-Setherkhepeshef, who would ascend to the throne under the name of Ramesses VIII; the tomb of this last has never been found.
The tomb was discovered in 1817 by Belzoni, and had an unspecified number of intrusive burials, probably dating up to Dynasty XXII. The prince's mummy has not been found.
KV19 is close to the end of a wadi of the east valley, clearly overhanging the base of the valley. It was dug in a rocky promontory situated between KV20 and KV43 (see gm-34). Oriented according to a north-east/south-west axis, the monument consists of a sloping approach to the entrance, followed of a sloping first corridor and, after another doorway, by the rough beginnings of a second corridor or chamber. The floor of this second corridor is pierced by a funerary shaft which was probably intended to received the prince's remains. Work in the tomb had then been abandoned.

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