viernes, 15 de enero de 2016

Female monkey and young as an ointment vessel.

Female monkey and young as an ointment vessel.



Flash
Ointments and oils were preferably kept in stone vessels. The most popular variety was that made of the bright and smooth calcite travertine, often erroneously called Egyptian alabaster. The cosmetic requisites were often decorated in an artistic manner. This container for perfumed oil is shaped like a female monkey pressing its young to its breast. A strong image has been created using simple techniques. The symbolism of the protective and loving mother animal was well-suited to a container for a medicinal substance. Other examples of vessels of this shape are known, but only from the Old Kingdom. The most recent find of such a vessel was made in the Dakhleh Oasis. Like the Vienna example, the Dakhleh vessel has a groove around the neck. Remains of a coloured paste inside this groove indicate that both vessels had the addition of a coloured collar. The Vienna vessel bears the name of King Meri-re (Pepi I) incised on the right arm of the mother monkey. Perhaps this indicates that the piece was a royal gift.

Present location

KUNSTHISTORISCHES MUSEUM [09/001] VIENNA

Inventory number

3886

Dating

PEPI I/MERIRE

Archaeological Site

UNKNOWN

Category

COSMETIC AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT AND IMPLEMENTS

Material

CALCITE/ALABASTER

Technique

STONE-TECHNIQUE

Height

14.4 cm

Width

6 cm

Depth

6.5 cm

Translation

The King of Upper Egpyt and Lower Egypt Meri-re.

Bibliography

  • Demel, H., Ein ägyptisches Salbengefäß aus dem Alten Reich. Jahrbuch der Kunsthististorischen Sammlungen in Wien. Neue Folge. 6. 1932. 3-8. figs. 1-4;
  • Katalog "5000 Jahre Ägyptische Kunst", Wien (1962).
  • Satzinger, H., Das Kunsthistorische Museum in Wien. Die Ägyptisch-Orientalische Sammlung. Zaberns Bildbände zur Archäologie 14. Mainz. 1994.


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